Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Mystical Feelgood Salvation

While Bible-believing Christians understand salvation as being made right with God and spiritual deliverance, other people want salvation in different ways. Because of its Christian connotations, other people seem to avoid the word. But they still seek relief from suffering and to obtain a feelgood experience.

Trends in psychology include mindfulness, counting blessings, and a mental happy place. These produce selfishness and are contrary to Scripture.
Modified from an image at Unsplash / Erik Brolin
There is a trend in psychology toward mindfulness which is a form of meditation that Christians should avoid. Actually, everyone should. Supposedly it relieves stress, but is actually counterproductive. Another secular feelgood technique is to count your blessings, but it leaves out God who provides our blessings. (I fell on Monday and needed medical care. Afterward, I thanked God that it wasn't worse, and that the people at the urgent care clinic had skill and compassion.) Another false feelgood salvation is to have people go to their "happy place", which often has a setting in nature.

Mindfulness actually causes selfishness. Counting your blessings is focusing on yourself and what you have, not thanking God for what he has provided. Nature  as a happy place without awareness of the Creator is further selfishness. The Christian life is the opposite, and our Creator tells us to seek the good of others as well as having humility. These secular feelgood salvation efforts are temporary when they work at all, but true salvation involves repentance and getting our priorities straight through Jesus.

At this point, I would appreciate it if you read "Can You Have Godliness without God?"

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