Wednesday, March 20, 2019

No Gospel in the Stars

There are people who believe that the constellations contain the gospel message, and it was there before the Bible was completed. Then, it became unnecessary. This is according to a woman named Frances Rolleston, whose work was published in 1865 and influenced many people. Unfortunately, he work was full of serious errors.

There are people who believe the story that the gospel message is in the constellations. It is based on bad biblical handling and even worse scholarship, and should be avoided.
Map of the Northern Sky with representations of the constellations / Albrecht Durer, 1515
Her books was published posthumously as a collection of notes. (I wonder if some of those were notes to herself to conduct further research, but when I do that I usually have a "look up" or "check on" phrase.) The concept of the gospel in the stars relies on spurious research and taking verses out of context. Like atheists and evolutionists, Rolleston seemed to use the scientific principle of Making Things Up™. She also took verses out of context to make this presentation.

Sincere people and even good pastors have believed this false story. While it is not directly harmful, it does show how people can believe something because they want to, and because things appear to have been researched before they were presented. Christians and creationists need to exercise caution, especially when someone comes along with a "new" concept or revelation. (This is aside from the falsehoods of the old earth creationists who claim that biblical young earth creation is a new concept. In reality, an old earth is the new kid in town.) Several cults and other false teachings have begun with "something new" (see "Lost World of John Walton" for a similar caution).

If someone was to have taken a different approach and say that they are going to use the constellations to present the gospel message but disregard the mythology associated them, fine. It would take a great deal of work. But the best way is to use what God has given to us in his Word. 
The gospel in the stars is a popular topic with many recent creationists. In an earlier paper, I examined some problems with this thesis. Since that earlier publication, the primary source on the subject has become available, allowing this much more detailed examination. In this current study, I identify many problems with the assumptions, methodologies, and conclusions made with the gospel in the stars thesis. The etymologies of terms and names are questionable at best and most likely are simply wrong. The biblical arguments are poor, and some conclusions are contrary to biblical principles. While well intended, the gospel in the stars is fraught with problems, and Christians are discouraged from using it.
The entire article is quite long. The link has a PDF download option, and for ebook readers, I suggest using Push to Kindle which gives you the option to do exactly that, or to download in MOBI or EPUB formats. To continue, click on "A Further Examination of the Gospel in the Stars".

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